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K1NSS custom QSL clients have a lot more to say at eHam.net.

"Very happy with my new QSL card..."

My wife's anniversary gift to me this year was a custom QSL by K1NSS. I can't think of a better gift for our "paper" anniversary. Jeff listened very carefully to my design ideas and clearly understood what I was asking for. It only took 2 sets of sketch iterations before he completely nailed the design, which incorporated my competitive interests in cycling, contesting, and SOTA. I am not sure of the final cost (since my wife footed the bill) but Jeff seemed to work very quickly and efficiently and the whole process only took a couple weeks after I first contacted him.

I am looking forward to hiring Jeff for other radio-related design jobs in the future.

Clayton NF1R

 

PS: True to his kind words, down the road NF1R hired me to draw his contest group's ARRL Field Day logo.  And that continuing relationship is exactly what I make every effort to cultivate at K1NSS Design.

Many of my clients are return customers - for specialized QSLs, club logos and web, eBook and print illustrations, as well as personal graphics to celebrate family occasions and special events. I consider each new client as a potential long term creative partner who can count on K1NSS Design for years to come.

A more recent post script to my QSL and logo work for NF1R, I was commissioned to design the cover of his first book.

In addition to competitive cyclist and radio contester, Clayton Nall is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and author of The Road to Inequality, published by Cambridge University Press.

I've created book covers for ham authors in the past, like Dan Romanchik KB6NU's No Nonsense ham license study guide series, and ARRL editor Ward Silver N0AX's Zone of Iniquity, and this latest commission brought fresh challenges.

I couldn't be more pleased and honored to work closely with Clayton Nall and Cambridge University Press to finalize the cover illustration and design of this important new American academic work.

What might we design together?